Localize It! What Resilience Looks Like

GO TO THE WEBSITE

www.localizeit2017.com 

Or register here

 

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Saturday and Sunday, October 21 – 22, 2017

A 2 DAY CONFERENCE CONNECTING PEOPLE AND LOCAL INITIATIVES IN A TIME OF GREAT CHANGE

VERMONT LAW SCHOOL, SOUTH ROYALTON, VERMONT

A two-day solutions focused gathering for leaders and community members engaged in accelerating a localizing movement in our region. We are working on systemic renewal in an age of climate crisis, economic injustice, and frayed democratic systems. This convening will forge new relationships and pathways toward improved localization of our economy, culture, democratic institutions, systems of energy, health and education, movements for justice, and other areas of intersection. We will learn from each other while bringing localization to the forefront of people’s imagination in our work toward a more resilient planet.

resilient-communities

 

 Keynote Speakers: Sherri Mitchell, Chuck Collins, Frances Moore Lappé, Helena Norberg Hodge, Jonathan Rosenthal, Christine Hanna

Sponsors: Local Futures, Vermonters for a New Economy, Sustainable Future Fund of the Vermont Community Foundation, New Economy Law Center at Vermont Law School, BALE (Building A Local Economy), and New England Resilience and Transition Network.

“Community wealth building begins with loyalty to geographical place. If globalization is the hallmark of the mainstream economy, re-localization is the hallmark of the alternative. Globalization works well for capital, which can move across borders with a computer keystroke, but the real economy of jobs, and families, and the land, always lives someplace real.”

-Marjorie Kelly and Sarah McKinley

“Intentional localization of production and all life-sustaining activity is key to our future thriving. This important work is joyous when done in community. There are many pathways toward greater local self-reliance and resilience.”

– Pamela Boyce Simms

“Localization is the real solution multiplier, with immediate economic, social and ecological benefits. By reducing the scale and reach of the economy, the environmental impacts of economic activity shrink as well. And the argument for localizing goes well beyond the environment. Among other things, localization allows us to live more ethically as citizens and consumers. In human scale economies, people are more connected to each other – something that, as we are increasingly realizing, is crucial to our health and well-being.”

– Helena Norberg-Hodge, Executive Director of Local Futures

 

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